What is gluten intolerance?

 

Gluten sensitivity or gluten intolerance) is a disorder in which the body is affected by gluten.

For your information, gluten is what helps dough (bread) rise and maintain elasticity.

Unfortunately, gluten is found in many forms throughout our (predominantly Western) diets. Avoiding gluten altogether has become extremely difficult for many people.

There are various signs that you are intolerant to gluten, and some of them include:
• Bloating of the stomach
• Gas
• Diarrhea
• Fatigue or feeling tired after a meal that contains gluten
• Dizziness
• Hormone imbalances
• Inflammation of the joins
• Mood issues

Those are just a few of the more recognizable symptoms of gluten intolerance but many more do exist.

One way to do your own test of whether or not you have some intolerance to gluten is to remove it from your regular diet for a few weeks and then reintroduce it. A few weeks may be too short of time for gluten to clear from your system but you may see some noticeable differences regardless.

How to follow a gluten-free diet?

One thing you need to know is that eliminating gluten from your diet means eliminating 100% from your diet. You cannot just eliminate “some” of it and expect your body to accept minor amounts.

For those who are gluten intolerant, eating even small amounts can and will damage your small intestine. Therefore, the gluten free diet is a lifelong, 100% commitment.

First, here’s what’s allowed on the gluten-free diet (according to several sources we found online):

Rice
Corn
Soy
Potato
Tapioca
Beans
Garfava
Sorghum
Quinoa
Millet
Buckwheat
Arrowroot
Amaranth
Tef
Montina®
Nut Flours
Here is what is not allowed:

Wheat (durum, semolina, kamut, spelt)
Rye
Barley
Triticale
Malt or malt flavoring (can be made from barley)
Malt vinegar (made from barley)
Rye
Triticale
Wheat (durum, graham, semolina, kamut, spelt)

Other things that are often overlooked that may contain gluten:

Breading, Coating mixes, Panko
Broth, Soup bases
Brown rice syrup
Candy – ex: Licorice, some Chocolates
Croutons
Flour or cereal products
Imitation bacon
Imitation seafood
Marinades
Pastas
Processed luncheon meats
Sauces, Gravies
Self-basting poultry
Soy sauce or soy sauce solids
Stuffing, Dressing
Thickeners (Roux)
Communion wafers
Herbal supplements
Drugs & Over-the-Counter Medications
Nutritional Supplements Vitamins & Mineral Supplements
Playdough: A potential problem if hands are put on or in the mouth while playing with playdough or are not washed after use